Steven L. Ossad

writer, historian, technology analyst, and Wall Street staff ride guy

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Selected Works

Finalist, 2011 Army Historical Foundation Distinguished Writing Award A hero who faced down Pancho Villa with only a pistol and turned the tide of battle during the Salerno Operation in late 1943, John Lucas discovered at Anzio that his comrades were more dangerous than his enemies.
Brevet Colonel, Commander of the 30th Indiana Volunteers, and recipient of the Medal of Honor - all by the age of 23 - Henry Lawton's career spanned four decades until he fell in battle "bringing democracy to a distant land."
Featured on the Center of Military History Civil War Website
The only American armored division commander to die in battle, Maurice Rose was the son and grandson of rabbis who rose from private to general to lead the premier American armored force to victory over the Nazi empire.
Winner, 2003 Army Historical Foundation Distinguished Writing Award
Creator of the modern American Rangers, Darby led his men to great victories and a catastrophic defeat, but was always in the thick of the action.
Martin Blumenson spent his life writing the history of an institution he respected greatly and knew intimately, the United States Army. He inspired generations of his students and successors to the highest standard of excellence.
Soldier, historian, biographer, memoirist, "novelist", and companion of Socrates, at the end of his life Xenophon wrote a small book proposing reform of the Athenian cavalry. A discussion of specific suggestions, the Hipparchicus reflects decades of the author's experience as an army commander. The wily survivor of battles, court intrigues, assassinations and staggering betrayals offers subtle insights on leadership - as well as observations valuable to modern theorists and practioners of the "mounted service" that will always resonate.
The Battle of Kadesh, the greatest chariot clash in all recorded history - and the arche-type for maneuver warfare - pitted the war-hardened Hittites against a young, untested Pharaoh. The struggle that followed shaped the destinies of the two dominant empires of the early Iron Age. Recorded by Rameses as a great Egyptian victory, it is a case study of how a brilliant and well-executed public relations campaign can trump performance - and reality.
More than 3,500 years ago, Abraham, the leader of the Hebrews, led his battalion on a daring, long-distance, commando raid to rescue hostages. Hidden in a very brief passage of Genesis is the story of the first organized military action and victory of the Jewish people, a tale of courage, inspired leadership and battle far from their borders. It is as if God wrote the prequel to Operation THUNDERBALL, the Israel Defense Forces dramatic rescue of Jewish hostages at Entebbe, Uganda on July 4, 1976.
Does it make any sense to talk about a "philosophy of war?" What kinds of things would be discussed in such an academic sub-category? Whose works would make up the canon of study? On that point, why is it that Carl von Clausevitz's early 19th century book "On War" is virtually the only work generally accepted as a work of war philosophy? In a world where war is so common, why is there so little systematic examination of its "first principles?" These are only a few of the questions that spark this general inquiry.

Major General Maurice Rose: World War II's Greatest Forgotten Commander




Testimonials



"As distinguished historian Martin Blumenson notes in his Foreword, Steven Ossad and veteran Don Marsh have written a biography of General Maurice Rose, the famed American armor commander, 'with sensitivity and skill'" Prof. A. Harding Ganz, The Journal of Military History, January 2004


“Your biography of Gen. Rose was illuminating. The 3rd Armored Division's accomplishments have been given their due. You have gone a long way in providing valuable insight to their valor and determination.” Maj. General Thomas Tait, Ret., former Commandant, U.S. Army Armor School, August 2003

"Maj. Gen. Maurice Rose was a remarkable officer who established a superb record as a combat leader. First as commander of the 2nd Armored Division’s Combat Command A and then as the commanding general of the 3rd Armored Division, Rose emerged as one of the most aggressive tactical commanders of the war. Whether Rose is "World War II’s greatest forgotten commander" is certainly debatable, but Ossad and Marsh have filled a huge gap in the war’s historiography by outlining the career of this legendary leader." Col. Cole C. Kingseed, USA Ret., Ph.D., Army Magazine, August 2003

"... a valuable work of military historical literature.... Mr. Ossad and Mr. Marsh have painstakingly researched the life of this fascinating although relatively unknown American hero." Martin K.A. Morgan, Research Historian, National D-Day Museum


"The highest ranking American Jew ever killed in action, he was one of the war's ablest yet almost forgotten officers. It was a daunting prospect for a biographer, but Steven Ossad and Don Marsh persevered, dug, and wrote this fully documented, meticulously detailed and absorbing study. It is a rewarding and inspiring portrait." WWII History Magazine, November 2003

MAJOR GENERAL MAURICE ROSE, Alex Brodsky

"Given the paucity of material General Maurice Rose left behind about anything except his impressive military achievements, this fine biography of a distinguished American commander, the highest-ranking American Jewish officer ever killed in battle, represents a considerable success."
Publishers Weekly, August 2003

"Maurice Rose, a tall, handsome soldier was a stand-offish person with those around him. No one in the 3rd Armored Division really got to know much about his personal life. Married twice, he kept his life so secret that his two sons, by different wives, did not know the other existed until many years after some digging by one of the authors. Rose was a brave man, single-minded, whose only mission was to defeat the Nazis as quickly and as throughly as possible. Whether that was due to his Jewish background (which he seemed to shun) or not is problematical. He demanded absolute loyalty from his men. He would not accept any excuse from any of his subordinate commanders -- accomplish your mission or move on! This book sheds a lot of light on the man whom General J. Lawton Collins regarded "as the top notch division commander in the business at the time of his death." I heartily recommend it especially to those who are interested in the fighting in North-west Europe during WWII."
Robert K. Pacios, Veteran of the 3rd Armored Division, Amazon, 2003


"During the Battle of the Bulge his 'daring, boldness, guile, and strength of will' emerged and showed him to be 'one of the greatest division commanders ever produced by our country' Hyperbole? Perhaps, but the authors convinced me that the name of Maurice Rose should be remembered along with that of General Patton." William F. Gavin, The Washington Times, August 17, 2003

"Rose became the highest-ranking American Jewish officer ever killed in battle. The incident even sparked a war crimes investigation. This book and its findings might be considered the final chapter in the investigation." Paul DeGaeta, Herald Tribune (FLA), September 4, 2003

"The book is judicious, fair and enterprising in its discovery of pertinent documents. We owe the authors a debt of gratitude for their intrepid sleuthing and sensitive comment on Rose's Jewish identity. One may imagine that it was not a simple task to navigate among the surviving family members." Hillel Goldberg, Intermountain Jewish News, Aprill 11, 2003

3rd Armored Division
Wartime Publications



Spearheading with the Third Armored Division, 1945


Thanks to Vic Damon, Webmaster, 3AD.COM
Steven L. Ossad (l) & Don R. Marsh, 1996

Jewish War Veterans Cartoon







Reviews of Major General Maurice Rose

A. Harding Ganz, Journal of Military History, January 2004.

“Alumnus Steven L. Ossad Publishes Book on Jewish WWII General”, New School Bulletin, Spring/Summer 2003

Rabbi Hillel Goldberg, Intermountain Jewish News, Denver Colorado, April 2003

"Tales of bravery and mystery surround WWII Jewish general," J News, September 12, 2003

Paul DeGaeta, Herald Tribune (FLA), September 3, 2003

3rd Armored Division Association Reunions




3rd Armored Division Websites